Filmmaker Andrew Robinson hopes the movie he made about the shooting tragedy at Columbine High School 10 years ago will have a positive impact on students who see it. "April Showers" was scheduled to be released to theaters nationwide April 24. It also w ill be available on iTunes, Indieflix.com and other pay-per-view digital services.
Filmmaker Andrew Robinson hopes the movie he made about the shooting tragedy at Columbine High School 10 years ago will have a positive impact on students who see it. "April Showers" was scheduled to be released to theaters nationwide April 24. It also w ill be available on iTunes, Indieflix.com and other pay-per-view digital services.
Filmmaker Andrew Robinson hopes the movie he has made about the shooting tragedy at Columbine High School 10 years ago will have a positive impact on students who see it.

Robinson's film, "April Showers," deals with the violence, death and recovery Columbine's victims went through.

It is a fictional account of an attack on a Midwestern high school and events that take place in the week that follows, as everyone deals with the trauma of loss, being a survivor and trying to make sense of something so senseless.

Robinson was a student at Columbine when, on the morning of April 20, 1999, fellow students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold entered the high school in the Denver suburb of Littleton with weapons and began firing on their classmates.

By the time the two youths had taken their own lives, 12 other students and a teacher were dead and more than 20 other people had been wounded.

Ranked as the fourth most deadly school shooting in the United States, Columbine remains the worst mass shooting to have taken place at an American high school. The massacre spurred debate on everything from gun control to violence among youths.

On the eve of the 10th anniversary of the shootings, hundreds of people gathered at a park near the school to remember the victims with a candlelight vigil.

Robinson's film stars Tom Arnold, Illena Douglas, Kelly Blatz and Daryl Sabara. Robinson, who wrote and directed the film, said the dramatized retelling of what it is like to be a Columbine survivor is a story he just couldn't keep inside.

"Truthfully, this came about by accident," he told the Denver Catholic Register, the newspaper of the Denver Archdiocese, prior to an advance screening of the film for media and school officials in March.

"I didn't intend to write it," he explained. "I was working on another project when it kind of wrote itself. Seventy-two hours after I began, the first draft of the script was finished."

Robinson showed the script to some friends who said it was about time a person with the point of view of someone who'd actually been at Columbine told the story.

"I like to think I was healed enough to write this story," he said. "But what I've discovered is the impact it's had on people outside of Columbine.

"I heard from students who never went through a Columbine-like experience, but who have had losses in their life," he said. "They're now getting something out of this film; they're opening up to friends and parents about things they've never been able to talk about before. That wasn't what I'd intended but I'll take it."

"April Showers" was scheduled to be released to theaters nationwide April 24. It also will be available on iTunes, Indieflix.com and other pay-per-view digital services.

Robinson said that all of the film's proceeds from the first week the movie is released will be donated to schools in districts where the movie is shown, as will a dollar from every download of "April Showers" online.

"Schools need our help now more than ever and if a film like 'April Showers' can help turn a negative into a positive by shedding light on aspects of a story never told and also give back to the community that supports it, then it's a win-win," Robinson said.

"We want the movie to be a success of course, but we want it to have a positive impact on the students who see it," he added.